Prebiotics vs. Probiotics

Prebiotics are not probiotics.

While the general public has long understood probiotics, prebiotics are less known. But there are significant differences between the two, including health benefits.

Probiotics are live bacteria in yogurt, other dairy products and pills. Doctors often prescribe probiotics to patients on antibiotics in an attempt to combat gastrointestinal side effects of the medication. And while probiotics have been shown effective in managing certain gastrointestinal conditions, they do not have the same power that prebiotics do.

Try Prebiotin Today

First, they’re delicate — heat and stomach acid can kill them, rendering them ineffective before they’ve even been digested. Also, those who don’t eat dairy foods for taste or dietary reasons may find ingesting adequate amounts of probiotics difficult, if not impossible. Finally, we don’t know which “good” bacteria our unique bodies would benefit from. For some people, a certain good bacterial strain would be helpful. For others, it may not. When we consume probiotics, we’re taking a guess at which bacteria might be helpful and hoping for the best. We’re also hoping the ones that make it past the heat and acid of our stomach will actually go on to provide some health benefits to our system.

If this is a probiotic then what is a prebiotic? In short, the prebiotic is a specialized plant fiber that beneficially nourishes the good bacteria already in the large bowel or colon. While probiotics introduce good bacteria into the gut, prebiotics act as a fertilizer for the good bacteria that’s already there. They help your good bacteria grow, improving the good-to-bad bacteria ratio. This ratio has been shown to have a direct correlation to your health and overall wellbeing, from your stomach to your brain.

The body itself does not digest these plant fibers. Instead, it uses these fibers to promote the growth of many of the good bacteria in the gut. These, in turn, provide many digestive and general health benefits. Recent studies have also shown prebiotics and good bacterial gut balance play a direct role in mental health. Individuals who consume prebiotics on a daily basis have fewer issues with anxiety, depression and stress. In fact, when their saliva was tested, it contained lower levels of cortisol. High levels of this hormone have been linked directly to mental health disorders.

Prebiotics, unlike probiotics, are not destroyed in the body. They are not affected by heat or bacteria. Getting the full benefits of prebiotics is easy, especially when consumed in a full-spectrum supplement form.

Prebiotin is the only full-spectrum prebiotic on the market. This means the Prebiotin formula of prebiotic supplements contains both inulin and oligofructose. This full spectrum formula treats the entire bowel wall for maximum effectiveness. And Prebiotin has been proven by numerous independent scientific studies to increase the number of healthy bacteria in the colon, the benefits of which are impressive and essential to overall health and well being.

Prebiotics in the colon

Probiotic vs Prebiotic

Prebiotics and probiotics both accomplish important health tasks for the human gut. Trying to decide between a probiotic and prebiotic supplement regimen? Consider these prebiotics vs probiotics facts:

PREBIOTIC VS PROBIOTIC

PREBIOTICS

PROBIOTICS

PREBIOTICS are a special form of dietary fiber that acts as a fertilizer for the good bacteria in your gut. PROBIOTICS are live bacteria in yogurt, dairy products and pills. There are hundreds of probiotic species available. Which of the hundreds of available probiotics is best for the average healthy person is still unknown.
PREBIOTIC powders are not affected by heat, cold, acid or time. PROBIOTIC bacteria must be kept alive. They may be killed by heat, stomach acid or simply die with time.
PREBIOTICS provide a wide range of health benefits to the otherwise healthy person. Most of these have been medically proven. PROBIOTICS are still not clearly known to provide health benefits to the otherwise healthy. Some are suspected but still not proven.
PREBIOTICS nourish the good bacteria that everyone already has in their gut. PROBIOTICS must compete with the over 1000 bacteria species already in the gut.
PREBIOTICS may be helpful for several chronic digestive disorders or inflammatory bowel disease. Certain PROBIOTIC species have been shown to be helpful for childhood diarrhea, irritable bowel disease and for recurrence of certain bowel infections such as C. difficile.

Prebiotin prebiotic supplements provide a range of important benefits not just to lower gut health but to overall well being, too. Our formula has been rigorously tested and medically proven to increase the number of healthy bacteria in the gut. Science has proven the health benefits of prebiotics include increased bone density, strengthened immune system, better-controlled weight and appetite, and improved bowel regularity. Recent studies have also found that individuals taking prebiotics experience improved mental health.

Consuming Prebiotic Fiber

chicory-2-high1

Chicory Root has the highest percentage of Prebiotic Fiber per gram

Live probiotic bacteria are easy to find and consume if dairy products are to your taste and meet your dietary needs. Yogurt, for example, contains probiotics; but where can you find prebiotic fiber? It’s easy if you know where to look.

Prebiotic fiber is found in many fruits and vegetables, such as the skin of apples, bananas, onions and garlic, Jerusalem artichoke, chicory root and beans. Sounds easy to get enough prebiotic fiber, right? Unfortunately, the minute amounts of fiber in each of these foods — such as 1 to 2 grams per serving — make ingesting enough fiber extremely difficult. Most people should consume at least 25 grams of fiber every day, and the foods highest in prebiotic fiber — chicory root is one such example — are nearly impossible to eat in large quantities every day. The good news is that adding a prebiotic fiber supplement to your diet is fast and simple. In supplement form, prebiotic fiber is also mild in texture and nearly tasteless, making it easy to add to water, cereal or any other food. Simply sprinkle it on your foods or in your favorite drinks to enjoy the many benefits. Prebiotin makes it even easier — you can buy it in on-the-go, single-serving packets that are perfect for a busy lifestyle.

How Prebiotics Help

For years, hardly anyone in the medical profession paid any attention to the role the colon plays in overall health. Over the past 15 years, however, we have discovered that the colon — and specifically, the bacteria that call the colon home — is incredibly important to wellness. The healthy bacteria that live there strengthen the bowel wall, improve mineral absorption and aid in the regulation of hormone production, which has a range of essential benefits. Prebiotics fertilize these good bacteria as they stifle production of the bad, disease-causing bacteria, and Prebiotin prebiotic fiber is independently shown to cause the multiplication of beneficial bacteria which combat gut dysbiosis.

Try Prebiotin Today

When you have ample beneficial bacteria, you can experience better overall health from a physical, mental and emotional standpoint. You’ll be better nourished, feel fuller, and able to achieve and maintain a healthy weight more easily.

Can You Take Probiotics and Prebiotics Together?

Yes, you can take probiotics and prebiotics together. Prebiotics do not negatively interact with probiotics. Prebiotics do not interfere with medications, either. High-quality probiotics and prebiotics are safe when taken together.

In fact, when you think about how probiotics and prebiotics work, it makes sense to take them together. Simply put, prebiotics are “food” for probiotics. Probiotics digest prebiotics and use the molecules as energy. In some ways, probiotics and prebiotics act synergistically for gut health.

When Is the Best Time to Take Prebiotics and Probiotics?

clockThe best time to take prebiotics and probiotics is regularly. Follow the recommendations for each one, take them at the same time each day and take them consistently.

Some sources have suggested that prebiotics should be taken before probiotics. The truth is that it really does not matter.

The body “processes” prebiotics and probiotics at different rates. It may take hours for prebiotics and probiotics to make their way to the large intestine. They may not travel through the intestines at the same rate. In fact, most probiotics die in the stomach acid and never make it to the large intestine at all. So, trying to precisely schedule the best time to take prebiotics and probiotics together is rather pointless. The good news is that there are bacteria in the large intestine ready to digest the prebiotics once they arrive.

When Is the Best Time to Take Prebiotics?

Again, consistency is the key to taking prebiotics. You want to provide the healthy microbes in your digestive tract with a steady supply of “food.” Just as you like to eat at the same time each day, healthy gut bacteria come to expect a consistent supply of nutrients. If you starve the bacteria, they will either stop multiplying or die off, opening the door to unhealthy bacteria. Make a schedule to take prebiotics, and then stick with it.

Many people find that prebiotics make them feel fuller, faster. In fact, this satiety has been shown in research studies and clinical trials. Therefore, people who are trying to maintain a healthy weight or lose weight could take prebiotics along with meals. Prebiotics can help people feel full even if they have eaten less.

When Is the Best Time to Take Probiotics?

Probiotics are mostly destroyed by stomach acid and digestive enzymes. People can help protect against this destruction by taking probiotics with meals. The food may act as a buffer to protect the probiotics as they make their way through the stomach and small intestine. On the other hand, digestion is increased during and immediately after a meal. Thus, eating could make a more hostile environment for the probiotics. One way to overcome each of these problems is to take enough active probiotic colonies so that at least some of them make it to the large intestine.

Prebiotics vs. Probiotics: Which Is Better?

Both prebiotics and probiotics can benefit human health. However, probiotics suffer from one major problem: they have a difficult time making it from the mouth to the large intestine. Compared to what was swallowed, only a relatively small number of living probiotic organisms reaches the gut.

Watch the full video on CBN News!
Prebiotics, on the other hand, are not digested by the human body, but are instead digested by gut bacteria. For prebiotics, what you eat is what you get. Prebiotics support the growth of healthy bacteria already in the large intestine. In some ways, probiotics are unnecessary for healthy individuals who consistently take prebiotics. For these reasons, prebiotics are better than probiotics for most people.

Prebiotin Prebiotic Fiber

Prebiotin prebiotic fiber is a full spectrum dietary supplement that contains oligofructose and inulin. These all-natural, plant-based fibers are independently shown to nourish the beneficial bacteria in the gut. Prebiotin is fat-free, cholesterol-free, sodium-free, gluten-free, low in carbohydrates and made in the United States using Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standards. If you’re trying to achieve or maintain a healthy weight, you may benefit from its satisfying properties. When taking Prebiotin, you’ll feel fuller longer. It also grows good bacteria in the gut, which produces fewer calories than bad bacteria. In addition, Prebiotin does not contain dangerous or untested chemicals, and it is suitable for vegetarian and vegan diets.

product-info-img

Try Prebiotin Today

Prebiotin has filed the following structure/function claims with the FDA (Food and Drug Administration):

Enhance the immune system
Increased calcium absorption and bone density
Weight management control
Correction of dysbiosis (bad colon bacteria), leaky gut and endotoxemia (toxins in the blood)

For a Lifetime of Great Gut Health – Just Feed It! with Prebiotin

Article Updated August 2nd, 2016
Frank W. Jackson, MD